Pace Egging

Home
Here We Go Again
Handsworth and Handsworth Wood
And Birmingham
Like An Old Fashioned Waltz
Gold Dust - Live at the Royalty
Charles Dickens 1812-1870
Scrooge (A Christmas Carol) 1951
London Odds and Ends
Plain Capers
Bandoggs
Fire and Sleet and Candlelight
Fi Fraser and Jo Freya
Eclection
Eclection Words
Rhythm & Blues
The Dog and Dustbin
Road
Villages
Hark! The Villages
The Battle Of The Field
The Albion Country Bands
Old Sir Simon The King
Pace Egging
Umps and Dumps
Gorse Hall
Arborfield, Berkshire
Tall Ships
Nelson
Norman Thelwell
A Garland of Carols
Harvest Home
Triple Echo
Rubber Folk
In Town Tonight
ITMA
Forest and Vale and High Blue Hill
Between The Severn and The Wye
A Country Christmas
Al Bowlly's In Heaven
Ghost Stories of an Antiquary
Canon Alberic's Scrap-book.
Lost Hearts
The Mezzotint
The Ash-tree
Number 13
Count Magnus
'Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad'
The Treasure of Abbot Thomas
Appearances Of A Different Sort
Robin Hood

Beg Your Leave

Trad. arr. Knight / Carthy / Hutchings / Hart / Prior

This song from the live repertoire of both Steeleye Span Mk 2 and the 1973 incarnation of the Albion Band was never released on any of their albums but Ashley Hutchings said in his songbook A Little Music:
 
"I have included this fine pace-egging song - which we used to sing onstage - as representative of that period of the band. It used to be sung by four of us, each one taking a character's part, virtually unaccompanied."
 
The song itself comes from Overton Village, Sunderland Point, Lancashire, and was sung by the pace-eggers (locally known as “jolly-boys”), the North-Western Easter-time mummers.

Beg Your Leave

I beg your leave, kind gentlemen and ladies of renown,
If you'll please to make us room we will sing to you a song,
You please to make us room, we will sing to you a song,
And we'll call in our comrades and call them one by one.
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know
 
So the first that does come in, he is a blooming youth,
He courts all the pretty girls, and always tells them truth;
He say's he'll never deceive them, he's always kind and true,
And 'tis his delight both day and night in drinking of strong brew.
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know
 
So the next that does come in, he is a sailor brave,
He says he's ploughed the ocean, and split the briny wave,
He says he has got gold, and he says he has got store,
And he says he'll marry a pretty girl and go to sea no more.
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know
 
So the next that does come in, oh he is a roving blade,
Amongst the lasses he will be, for he is such a jade,
Red rosy cheeks are his delight, most beautiful and fair,
And if you want a sweetheart, you must come to Overton fair!
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know
 
So the next that does come in, oh she is Miss Kitty Fair,
She takes a great delight in the curling of her hair,
She carries a basket by her side - she's got no store put in -
It's her delight delight both day and night in drinking of strong gin.
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know
 
So now you've seen us all, speak of us as you find,
You'll please to give up a trifle - it will be very kind.
So cheer up your spirits while we drink a glass of beer,
And we'll drink you health and store your wealth until the very next year.
 
Oh we're jolly boys, we do no harm
Wherever we do go
For we've come a pace-egging
As you very well do know.

Compare to this A Calling-On Song
from Steeleye Span Mk.1
on their only album Hark! The Village Wait.

Traditionally -- Pace Eggs were part
of the Easter Sunday breakfast,
but if they weren't eaten they might
be used as household ornaments, in
 various egg-games, or given to bands
 of performers known as Pace Eggers,
who were once a common sight in
northern English villages

the albion chronicles.2 website
is 2005/2006/2007 sam-and-lizzie
all rights reserved